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Posts tagged ‘the Alexander Technique’

Some of Us

Alexander’s work is like a multi-faceted diamond.

Some of us become fascinated with the body, how it works, some of us specifically with how it moves, others with the natural grace and physical beauty inherent within our original design.

Some of us feel that Alexander’s work is complete within itself, all encompassing. Others of us enjoy interfacing Alexander’s work with other somatic disciplines such as Yoga, Tai Chi, Aikido, Feldenkrais, Somatic Experiencing, BodyMind Centering just to name a few.

Some of us devote ourselves to applying Alexander’s work to art, particularly the performing arts, to dance, acting, and music, and to the creative process. For others of us, everyday life becomes our art form, our vehicle through which we study and evolve.

Some of us become less interested in the body per se, but in consciousness, embodied mindfulness, and in sensory receptivity.

Some of us become intrigued with how we react or respond to myriad stimuli from within us and all around us, to our own thoughts, emotions, and sensations, and to the thoughts, emotions, and actions of others. We study the role habit and choice play in our lives.

Some of us become enthralled in the connection between Alexander’s work and physiology, psychology, philosophy, theology, sociology, gender studies. Some of us become intrigued by the relationship between movement and meaning, or between culture and coordination, or between physical and spiritual grace, or between science and sentience.

Some of us love and teach through procedures developed by Alexander and enjoy using his language when speaking about the work. Others of us teach through procedures developed by first and second generation teachers, or have chosen to teach through our own procedures, and prefer using contemporary language through which to get Alexander’s ideas across to others. Some of us enjoy using images and metaphors to help us when teaching, and others do not.

Some of us teach predominately through observation and language, others of us predominately through silence and touch. And many of us interweave all in the process of imparting Alexander’s work.

Some of us work more educationally and others more therapeutically. Some of us are interested in injury prevention and rehabilitation, others in learning how to be more open, open to new ideas, to acquiring new ways of perceiving and understanding ourselves, that is, in self-knowledge, in becoming freer and happier.

Some of us belong to this professional society or that professional society, others to no professional society. Some have trained within a training program structured in one way or within a training program structured in another way. Others have gone through apprenticeships, and a few of us, like Alexander himself, have trained essentially on their own. Some of us have trained through one lineage, others through another, others through multiple lineages.

Some of us teach a lot, some a little, some not at all. Some of us love Alexander’s books, and others of us find them tedious and convoluted.

This is who we are. This is our community at large. There was a time, when I was younger and full of hubris and just plain foolish, that I was convinced my training and orientation to Alexander’s work was superior to others, stemming from the one lineage that truly possessed the essence of Alexander’s work. But now, thankfully, I don’t feel that way. I have come to embrace the diversity within our community at large and to see this diversity as healthy and lively and creative.

It is so freeing to know that we can pursue our own approach to the work because so many others are pursuing their approaches to the work. For example, I can work more experimentally, procedurally and linguistically, because I know that others are preserving Alexander’s language and procedures. That is a great relief to me.

Now, after 50 years inside of Alexander’s world, I find myself for everyone and against no one. Finally, I am becoming freer and more flexible, acquiring some mobility of mind. Maybe this was precisely what Alexander was after. Maybe this was what Alexander meant by being but a signpost pointing all of us into unknown directions, and so, so many directions at that.

A good question might be, how can we transition from thinking in terms of some of us, to thinking in terms of all of us? How can we zoom out so far that, like an eagle high in the clear blue sky, we can see the finest of details and, at the same time, behold the entire field, the parts and the whole that is greater than the sum of its parts, not just one facet of the diamond, but the entire diamond, and not only the entire diamond, but the light that shines from that diamond, outwards in myriad directions into the world, and inwards as well, illuminating who we are and what we might become.

The Top Ten Myths about the Alexander Technique

A fellow Alexander teacher asked if I had a transcript of my little youtube video, Top Ten Myths about the Alexander Technique. It was somewhere in my computer. I found it and tweaked it just a bit. I added a few photos that support some of the ideas. This piece has also been translated into 17 languages. If your native language is other than English, you may find it here.

Feel free to share it. To understand these ideas more deeply, I would encourage you to read, Teaching by Hand/Learning by Heart – Delving into the Work of F.M. Alexander, a book I wrote, published by Jean Fischer at Mouritz Press.

THE TOP TEN MYTHS ABOUT THE ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE

Hi. My name is Bruce Fertman. I’m the founding director of the Alexander Alliance International.  Here are ten myths about the Alexander Technique that many people believe are true.  After 50 years of dedicated study, and after training 300 teachers, I have come to realize that these ideas are not true.

One.

The Alexander Technique is about posture. That’s a myth.

Reality. The Alexander Technique is about un-posturing. The problem is that we are continually posturing, most often unconsciously. The Alexander Technique is about becoming an un-postured person, that is, unheld, unfixed, flexible, movable, not only physically, but as a person in general.

 

Photo: B. Fertman

 

Two. 

The Alexander Technique is about uprightness. That’s a myth.

Reality. The Alexander Technique has nothing to do with standing up straight.  There is not one straight line in the body, or in the universe for that matter. The Alexander Technique has nothing to do with doing anything right, or correctly. It is about doing what we do well, efficiently, effectively, fluidly, comfortably, and pleasurably.

 

Photo by: Anchan of B. Fertman

 

Three. 

The Alexander Technique is about how we hold our head on our neck. That’s a myth.

Reality. The Alexander Technique is about how we stop holding our head on our neck. It’s about not interfering with inherent balancing mechanisms that do that for us.

 

Photo: B. Fertman – Sherry Stephenson

 

Four.

The Alexander Technique is about the body. That’s a myth.

Reality. The Alexander Technique is about us, about how we are within ourselves, with others, and in relation to the world around us. It’s about the quality of our actions and interactions. It’s about the quality of our experience. It’s about how we are being as we do what we are doing.

 

Photo: B. Fertman

 

Five.

The Alexander Technique is about becoming more symmetrical because symmetry is balanced. That’s a myth.

Reality. Nothing in nature is perfectly symmetrical, including humans. Symmetry is a concept, like a point, or a line is a concept. Buddha might look symmetrical when he’s sitting peacefully on a lotus flower but take a closer look and we see one foot on top of the other, and one hand on top of the other. Look closely at any persons’ face and we won’t find perfect symmetry. We’re after harmony, not symmetry, and harmony is not related to the shape of our body at any given moment.

 

Photo: B. Fertman

 

Six. 

The Alexander Technique is about balance. That’s a myth.

Reality. Balance for humans is impossible. We are inherently unbalanced, and this is what promotes movement. We waver toward and away from equilibrium. This is a good thing. When the wind blows, waves are generated upon the surface of a pond. The wind stops and those waves become smaller, approaching but never attaining stillness. Stillness is a concept, a beautiful one, but within stillness lies motion, however subtle.

 

Lucia Walker: Alexander teacher, Johannesburg, South Africa

 

Seven.

The Alexander Technique is about learning how to breathe correctly.  That’s a myth.

Reality. We don’t breathe. Alexander once said, “At last, I find that when I don’t breathe, I breathe.” I would say it like this. At last, I find that when I don’t breathe, I am breathed. We are breathed by forces deep within us and all around us. Do we breathe when you are sleeping?  Do we breathe when we are eating? Yes, we can take a breath. But breath is not for the taking. It does not belong to us. Breath is a gift from the world. It’s meant to be received. Breathing is responsive. It responds to activity. It is not something we do; it is not an activity, like running up a hill. When we run up a hill, do we first stand there and breathe and get enough air, and then run up the hill? Or do we run up the hill and breathing automatically and faithfully responds to our wishes, without our even having to ask?

 

 

Eight.

The Alexander Technique is about learning how to stand, how to stand on our own two feet. That’s a myth.

Reality. We do not stand on our own two feet. We stand on the ground.

 

 

Nine.

The Alexander Technique is about learning how to relax. That’s a myth.

Reality. The Alexander Technique is about readiness. The Alexander Technique is about preparing for nothing in particular, while being ready for anything that may happen. The Alexander Technique is about effortlessly returning, again and again, to a condition of alert, calm readiness.

 

Photo: Anchan – Alexander teacher: Britta Brandt-Jacobs

 

Ten.

The Alexander Technique is about proper body mechanics; learning the best way to get up and down from a chair, how to walk correctly, how to bend down without hurting yourself, etc. That’s a myth.

Reality. Human beings are not mechanical.  We are not machines. We’re organic.  We’re mammals. The Alexander Technique is about learning how we are best designed to function as Homo Sapiens.  The Alexander Technique is, in part, about questioning cultural, gender, and cosmetic concepts of the body that interfere with the functioning and beauty of our natural design.

 

 

Bruce Fertman

The Alexander Alliance Europe

Teaching by Hand/Learning by Heart

 

 

 

 

 

Mit Händen Lehren/Von Herzen Lernen

Leserstimmen

Dieses Buch war lange überfällig – das einzige AT Buch, das mir begegnet ist, in dem das Potenzial an menschlichem Reichtum, Tiefgang und Kontakt, welches in unserer Arbeit zu finden ist, voll zum Ausdruck kommt.

Marcus Sly – Alexanderlehrer – West Sussex, UK

Meisterhaft. Diese glänzende, erkenntnisreiche Sammlung von Essays ist eine anmutige und freigiebige Schilderung Fertmans eigener Erfahrungen im Lernen und Lehren der Alexandertechnik. Fertman besitzt die Gabe, die feinen Nuancen und erhebenden Tiefen der Alexander-Praxis herauszuarbeiten. Der Band ist überaus fesselnd und mit bemerkenswerter Verständlichkeit geschrieben, und die große Empathie des Autors gegenüber seinen Schülern ist durchweg zu spüren. Sehr zu empfehlen – eine echte Schatzkiste.

Anonymer Amazon Kundenkommentar

Bruces Art des Schreibens ist voller Emotion – Liebe, Friede, Freude, Traurigkeit, Neugier; dabei ist es bemerkenswert, wie tief und schön und ohne Sentimentalität er diese Emotion ausdrückt. Er schaut hinter die profane Ansammlung von Köpfen, Hälsen und Körpern, mit denen die Alexandertechnik beginnt; hinter die nächste Schicht, wie die Schüler ihre Lebensentscheidungen treffen; genau auf den innewohnenden emotionalen Wesenskern des Schülers. Seine Geschichten und Bilder nehmen uns mit in seinen Unterricht, unversehens lernen wir an der Seite seiner Schüler. Ein Buch zum genießen und sich daran ergötzen.

Karen Evans – Alexanderlehrerin – Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire, UK

Dieses Buch ist voller Menschen, voller Leben. Bruces Lehre ist zum Ausdruck seines Wesens geworden.

Jacek Kaleta – Alexanderlehrer – Tychy, Polen

Ich liebe Bruces Buch – jede Seite ist eine Lektion. Dabei wirkt es wie ein Zwiegespräch, das macht es so lebendig und persönlich für den Leser. Dies ist das erste Buch, das ich meinen Schülern nicht nur empfehlen, sondern sogar mit ihnen durcharbeiten möchte.

Annie Davenport Turner – Alexanderlehrerin – Mere, Wiltshire, UK

 

Just out. I can’t read it. Please share with those who can.

Might make a good holiday present!

Available in hard and soft cover.

Please order this book by writing to Lara Weidmann at:

info@werkstatt-auslieferung.de

The publisher will mail it right out to you.

You can purchase it on Amazon.de

but it would help us very much if you ordered it directly from the publisher.

Thank you for doing that for us.

 

 

 

 

 

Living Life from the Inside Out – Explorations into the Work of F.M. Alexander – Saturday and Sunday, April 25/26, 2020

Photo: B. Fertman – Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

For many of us, there’s lots to do in a day, places to be, responsibilities to be met. We’re busy. Sometimes stressed. Sometimes exhausted. It’s as if we have become human doings rather than human beings.

In Psalm 90, King David suggests we “number our days, that we may attain a heart of wisdom”. How do we want to live out our days? Do we want to run frantically through them, or do we want to walk through them with some degree of composure and coherence?

To do so, it helps to cultivate a deep and reliable sense of ourselves from the inside out. Cultivating a deep, somatically organized, felt sense of self can help us to meet life’s challenges as they arise.

Alexander’s work has much to offer us when it comes to learning to live our lives from the inside out. If this subject is of interest to you, then please join me for a day of lightness and pleasure, as we acquire some useful skills for learning how to walk well through the days allotted us.

About

Bruce Fertman

Bruce’s touch is like a butterfly settling down on the very turning point of your soul.

And then you know, ‘That’s who I am, that is who I could be.’

Margarete Tueshaus
Equestrian, Argentine Tango Teacher, Alexander Technique Teacher, Bochum, Germany

Bruce has been using his hands, helping people to move well, for fifty-five years. He trained with five first generation Alexander teachers: Catherine Merrick Wielopolska, Marjorie L. Barstow, Richard M. Gummere Jr., Elisabeth Walker, and Erika Whittaker. Bruce brings a lifetime of training as a movement artist and educator to his work as an Alexander teacher, having trained in Gymnastics, Modern Dance, Ballet, Contact Improvisation, Tai Chi Chu’an, Aikido, Chanoyu, Argentine Tango, and Kyudo. In 1982, Bruce co-founded the Alexander Alliance International, an intergenerational, multicultural community/school. Currently director of the Alexander Alliance Germany, Bruce also teaches annually for Alexander Alliance training programs in Japan, Korea, and America. He conducts post graduate training programs in Dorset and Zurich. Author of  Teaching By Hand/Learning By Heart – Delving Into The Work Of F.M. Alexander.

Workshop Details:

When: Saturday and SundayApril 25/26, 2020

Saturday 25th 10.00 – 17.00 Lunch included

Sunday 26th 09.00 – 16.00 lunch included

Fee: £120 first day/£200 both days.

Where: Gaunts House, Dorset

http://www.gauntshouse.com/

To register for the workshop contact Ruth Davis at: ruth.a.davis@me.com

Phone: +44 (0) 7590 406267

To Make Payment: 

BACS

(Please reference your payment with your full name.) Sort Code: 40-47-59

Account No: 12037351

Acc Name R Davis

International Transfers via:

IBAN: GB24MIDL40475912037351 BIC:MIDLGB2172

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to write to me, bf@brucefertman.com or to Ruth Davis, ruth.a.davis@me.com.

 

 

 

The Alexander Alliance International – Loving the Work, Living the Work, Teaching the Work – Kalamata, Greece – October 10-18, 2020

The

Gathering

in

Kalamata, Greece

Loving the Work, Living the Work, Teaching the Work

October 10-18, 2020

40-blue-caves-on-zakynthos-island-3096.jpg

Join us, the Alexander Alliance International, in celebrating our 40th birthday in Kalamata, Greece!

​If you have ever been, currently are being, or would like to be deeply touched by the work we do within our international community/school, we invite you to join us for this extraordinary event.

Anyone who studies, or has studied the Alexander Technique, is welcome to attend: all Alexander teachers and trainees worldwide, all Alexander Alliance trainees and alumni, including alumni from our early incarnations; the Alexander School and the Alexander Foundation. Also, all teachers from our post graduate programs and from our professional development programs. Finally, all people who love and study the Alexander Technique.

Senior teachers from the Alexander Alliance International, Robyn Avalon, Midori Shinkai, Margarete Tueshaus, and Bruce Fertman will be teaching. Learn more about our senior teachers. We are planning to invite other renowned Alexander teachers and will keep you informed of our progress.

We will be on Mediterranean time. Though our teaching schedule will be quite full, we will make sure to have time each afternoon for walks inside the town, or for swimming in the sea.

A native Alexander teacher writes:

“Kalamata, as I’m sure you already know, is well known for its olive trees and the unique olive oil it produces. The local food is to die for. The hotel is a 10min drive from the main town. The sea in Kalamata boasts of some of the clearest waters in the country – you will see for yourself once you swim well away from the beach at approximately 1 mile inside where one can experience the awe of being in the middle of nowhere. It’s magical. A great advantage is that Kalamata is not your average touristy location – more of a preferred site for locals. It is likely to be exactly what you need for a peaceful retreat. I would highly recommend experiencing local olive oil poured on to freshly baked local bread … the purest form of the local natural flavours. Meat and fish for non-vegeterians will be an experience they will never forget. Likewise, the tomatoes, olives, cucumbers and green peppers will also be a flavour that vegans and vegeterians will cherish for the rest of their lives. The local deserts are very dense jams of local fruits and vegetables (there’s the famous aubergine jam!). Herbal teas are unique in Kalamata, with some protagonists being marjoram, sage, camomile and sideritis (known as mountain tea). For coffee lovers, Greece is a paradise.”

​Not only will we be in Kalamata, we will be living and dining by the sea at a four-star hotel: The Filoxenia Kalamata. We are providing a PDF (click here) so that you can hold on to all the details about where we will be. Being a family friendly school, students do on occasion bring along family members. If you should decide to do this, let us know and we will help you work out your accommodations.

​Now, to return to the content of our Alexander Retreat!

​As we will be a gathering of people with different levels of experience, there will be separate classes for students, trainees, and teachers, so that everyone can work and progress at their own level. At chosen times, we will all convene and work together.

​Here’s the schedule.

​Saturday / October 10th

Travel and Arrival Day

Our first short gathering will begin at 21:00.

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday / October 11th, 12th, 13th

Optional Morning Classes: To Be Announced

Morning Classes: 9:30-13:30

Afternoon Break 13:30 – 17:00

Late Afternoon Classes 17:00-20:00

Dinner: 20:00-21:30

Evening Events: To Be Announced

Wednesday / October 14th

On Wednesday, we will only have morning classes so that those who wish can take off the entire afternoon and evening to further explore the outskirts of Kalamata. Space will be provided for those who wish to stay at the retreat center and study together informally.

Thursday, Friday, Saturday / October 15th, 16th, 17th

Back to work.

Optional Morning Classes: To Be Announced

Morning Classes: 9:30-13:30

Afternoon Break 13:30 – 17:00

Late Afternoon Classes 17:00-20:00

Dinner: 20:00-21:30

Evening Events: To Be Announced

Sunday / October 18th

Travel and Departure Day

 

How much will it cost?

​We have done our best to keep our pricing reasonable. We got a remarkable group deal with the hotel, which is why we could hold this retreat in such a luxurious place. Here are the prices, which includes three meals per day.

​Triple room: EUR 53,33 per person per night (limited number)

Double room: EUR 67,50 per person per night

Single room: EUR 110,00 per person per night

​Additionally, there is a room tax of EUR 3,00 per room per night, which is payable directly upon checkout.

The entire booking will be made by the Alexander Alliance Germany. We had to commit to paying the room and board for everyone, and therefore our cancellation policy is stricter than if everyone were responsible for paying for their own room and board.

Here is how it works: When you register for the retreat, your room and board must be paid in advance to the Alexander Alliance Germany. If you should have to cancel, we can refund your tuition, but we cannot refund your room and board. If you find a person to fill your place in the retreat, then we can totally refund your cost for room and board.

​As for tuition.

​Alexander Alliance International Trainees:

Very Early Bird: EUR 450 (until 15th January 2020)

Early Bird: EUR 500 (until 31st May 2020)

Late Bird: EUR 550 (registration deadline is 15th September 2020)

Alexander Alliance Alumni, Post Graduate Graduates, and High Touch Graduates:

Very Early Bird: EUR 600 (until 15th January 2020)

Early Bird: EUR 650 (until 31st May 2020)

Late Bird: EUR 700 (registration deadline is 15th September 2020)

Alexander Alliance Self Development Programs and Guests (Alexander Trainees, Alexander Teachers, Alexander Students):

Very Early Bird: EUR 700 (until 15th January 2020)

Early Bird: EUR 750 (until 31st May 2020)

Late Bird: EUR 800 (registration deadline is 15th September 2020)

 

 

​What are our options for getting to Kalamata and our hotel?

​Click on this link for starters, but we are going to make it even easier.

https://www.filoxeniakalamata.com/explore-peloponnese/map.html

​It’s low season, so there are not many direct flights to Kalamata, and they may be a bit more expensive, but it is possible. Flying into Athens, may be the more affordable way to go.  We will organize a bus transfer from Athens airport (ATH) to the hotel on Saturday afternoon, October 10th, and also one from the hotel to Athens airport (ATH) on Sunday morning, Oct 18th. Thanks to our 4-star hotel, the price will  be quite affordable, depending upon how many of us, ranging from EUR 40 to EUR 15 per way.

​We will arrange for the bus to leave on October 10th from Athens airport (ATH) to our hotel in Kalamata around 16:30, and from our hotel in Kalamata to Athens airport (ATH) on October 18th, around 8:00. The drive will take between 3 and 3,5 hours. Another option would be to individually rent a car at Athens airport and give it back in Kalamata.

 

How to sign up and make it official.

​Please register by going to our website, www.alexanderalliance.org, scrolling down to the registration form, fill it out, and send it to us. If you have any questions as to the content of the retreat, please write to bf@brucefertman.com and if you have any organizational questions please write to m.gassner@alexanderalliance.de.

 

Body and Being – Delving Into the Work of F.M. Alexander – April 12/13, 2019 – Bruce Fertman – Dorset, England

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Navajo Woman – photo: B. Fertman

Identity would seem to be the garment with which one covers the nakedness of the self: in which case, it is best that the garment be loose, a little like the robes of the desert, through which one’s nakedness can always be felt, and, sometimes, discerned.

Baldwin

In Latin, the word persona means mask, or character. Having a persona implies there being a person behind the persona. Do we know our persona? Can we distinguish between our persona and who we are as a person?

Our word “character” derives from the Greek, kharakter, meaning an engraved mark or an imprint on the soul. The word engraved carries with it a sense of permanence, something not easily erased or undone, as does the word imprint. If we say that a person is of upstanding character, we suggest they are consistently and reliably honest and decent in their way of being in the world. But we might also say of someone, “They are a real character!” When we say this what we are saying is that there is something that sticks out about them, usually in a way that is odd or funny. In both cases, we are seeing something engraved, a mark of some kind, that seems to be a part of who they are. But is it?

Character is fixed, dense, hard; the Self fluid, soft, spacious.

In the Sukha Sutra, Buddha says it like this.

If we are like rock and something cuts into us, it will leave its mark, perhaps for generations to come.

If we become like sand and something cuts into us, it will leave its mark, but soon that mark will be gone.

And, if we become like water and something cuts into us, as soon as the mark appears, it will disappear, forever.

This is the goal, to become unfixed, un-postured, unbraced, unblocked. To become unafraid, unashamed, unaffected. To become unassuming, unarmed, unburdened. To become unbiased, unchained, uncovered. To become untied, unguarded, undiminished. To become unmasked, unpretentious, unhurried. To become unsophisticated, unselfish, unspoiled. To become untangled, unveiled. Unwritten.

Please join me.

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Bruce’s touch is like a butterfly settling down on the very turning point of your soul. And then you know, ‘That’s who I am, that is who I could be.’

 In Bruce’s class you feel as if you are sitting by a deep, soft lake. His pace and patience, his quiet confidence, allows people to unfold and open layer by layer. The superfluous falls away, leaving only life’s inner vitality effortlessly expressing itself through you.

Margarete Tueshaus
Equestrian, Argentine Tango Teacher, Alexander Technique Teacher, Bochum, Germany

About Bruce Fertman

Bruce has been using his hands, helping people to move well, for fifty-five years. He trained with five first generation Alexander teachers: Catherine Merrick Wielopolska, Marjorie L. Barstow, Richard M. Gummere Jr., Elisabeth Walker, and Erika Whittaker. Bruce brings a lifetime of training as a movement artist and educator to his work as an Alexander teacher, having trained in Gymnastics, Modern Dance, Ballet, Contact Improvisation, Tai Chi Chu’an, Aikido, Chanoyu, Argentine Tango, and Kyudo. In 1982, Bruce co-founded the Alexander Alliance International, an intergenerational, multicultural community/school. Currently director of the Alexander Alliance Germany, Bruce also teaches annually for Alexander Alliance training programs in Japan, Korea, and America. He conducts post graduate training programs in Dorset and Zurich. Author of  Teaching By Hand/Learning By Heart – Delving Into The Work Of F.M. Alexander.

Workshop Details:

When: Friday and SaturdayApril 12/13, 2019

Friday – 12:30-18:30 followed by supper/Saturday – 10:00-17:00 – lunch 13:00-14:00

Fee: £120 first day/£200 both days.

Where: Gaunts House, Dorset

http://www.gauntshouse.com/

To register for the workshop contact Ruth Davis at: ruth.a.davis@me.com

Phone: +44 (0) 7590 406267

To Make Payment: 

BACS

(Please reference your payment with your full name.) Sort Code: 40-47-59

Account No: 12037351

Acc Name R Davis

International Transfers via:

IBAN: GB24MIDL40475912037351 BIC:MIDLGB2172

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to write to me, bf@brucefertman.com or to Ruth Davis, ruth.a.davis@me.com.

Hope to see you at Gaunts House!

Bruce Fertman

 

 

Etwas Leichtigkeit – Übersetzung: Matthias Liesenhoff

Herr Yamamoto hatte einen langen Tag.

Endlich am Ende angelangt, steigt er auf sein Fahrrad und schlängelt sich durch enge Straßen, gesäumt von alten, staubigen Läden und verwitterten Holzhäusern. Es ist Winter, 18:30 und bereits dunkel. Schwere weiße Schneeflocken fallen in Zeitlupe durch einen indigoblauen Himmel, so wie sie es in Kyoto seit 1400 Jahren tun.

Aus den Nebenstraßen des alten Kyoto taucht Herr Yamamoto auf wie in eine andere Welt; weite Straßen voller vertikaler Neonreklamen, große LED Werbeflächen, Hochhäuser von Finanzinstituten und teure Kaufhäuser. Er hält an vor einem 7-Eleven, schnappt sich ein Bento und eine Packung Butterkekse zum Teilen während der Pause, steigt wieder auf sein Fahrrad und bemerkt, dass er spät dran ist.

Herr Yamamoto ist ein 50-jähriger Mathelehrer an einer Oberschule, der vom Ruhestand träumt. In seiner verschlissenen Leder-Aktentasche, die nun scheinbar erschöpft in seinem Fahrradkorb ruht, sind die Klausuren seiner Schüler, die er später in der Nacht noch benoten wird, denn an diesem Abend wird er selbst an einem Unterricht teilnehmen, einer Klasse für sich selbst.

Herr Yamamoto hofft, mehr über seinen Körper zu lernen. Er möchte mehr Energie haben. Er möchte etwas Spaß haben, sich etwas Gutes tun. Der Empfehlung eines Freundes folgend, hat er sich gegen seine Vernunft angemeldet für eine Reihe von Stunden in Alexandertechnik.

Etwa zwölf Schüler haben sich versammelt, Männer und Frauen, alte und junge, größtenteils Menschen, die sich einfach lebendiger fühlen wollen, ein bisschen leichter, ein bisschen glücklicher.

An diesem Abend habe ich mit den Schülern gearbeitet an Tätigkeiten, die sie im Beruf ausführen müssen; an Dingen, die sie nicht gerne tun. Ich arbeitete mit einem Mann, der Telefonanrufe von verärgerten Kunden annimmt, die sich beschweren über das, was sie gerade kauften und es zurückgeben möchten. Ich arbeitete mit einer Frau, die auf Händen und Knien einen Holzboden schrubbt. Ich arbeitete mit einem Mann, der sich morgens als erstes von seinem Boss anschreien lassen muss.

Nun ist Herr Yamamoto an der Reihe. Er öffnet seine Aktentasche und lässt  den Stapel unbenoteter Klausuren herausgleiten. Er geht hinüber zu einem Schreibtisch in der Ecke, setzt sich hinter den Schreibtisch, wirft den Stapel Papiere auf den Tisch, zieht einen Bleistift aus seiner Hemdtasche, seufzt tief, und beginnt.

Ich schaue nur, fühle was er fühlt, spüre was geschieht durch meinen gesamten Körper, so wie ich seinen gesamten Körper betrachte. Unter dem Tisch sehe ich seine Füße und Beine einwärts gedreht, besonders sein linkes Bein. Sein Becken rollt zurück. Sein Magen ist eng. Seine Brust ist eingesunken. Sein Kopf sinkt und neigt sich nach links. Sein Körper sieht aus, als würde er weinen, aber Herr Yamamoto weint nicht. Dann sehe und fühle ich es: stumme, verzweifelte Resignation.

Herr Yamamoto kritzelt etwas auf die erste Klausur. „Wie hat Ihr Schüler abgeschnitten?“ frage ich. „D. Nicht gut.“ Herr Yamamoto macht weiter. C. D. C+. F. Er schüttelt seinen Kopf. Er altert vor meinen Augen.

„Herr Yamamoto (so nennt ihn jeder), wie wäre es, wenn ich Ihnen ein wenig helfe?“ „Onegaishimasu“ sagt er, sich leicht verbeugend. „Bitte helfen Sie mir.“ Ich gehe hinter ihn, lege sanft meine Hände an beide Seiten seines Nackens und führe sachte seinen Kopf zurück nach oben. Sein Körper steigt, wie ein Mann, der lange unter Wasser war und endlich hochkommt, um Luft zu holen. Seine Brust schwillt, sein ganzer Körper dehnt sich reflexartig in alle Richtungen. „Zen, zen chigau, waaaaa“ sagt Herr Yamamoto mit einem Ausdruck von Ekstase auf seinem Gesicht. Alle lachen. Ich kann fühlen, wie sehr alle ihn mögen.

„Okay, Herr Yamamoto, zensieren Sie weiter ihre Klausuren und wir schauen, was passiert.“

  1. Alle lächeln, bis auf Herrn Yamamoto. B+. Eeeeeeeeh!?, ein aufsteigender Klang, zu hören, wenn Japaner angenehm überrascht sind. Mehr Lächeln und etwas Lachen, aber nicht von Herrn Yamamoto.
  2. A. A+. A. Nun rollen sich alle buchstäblich vor unkontrollierbarem Lachen auf dem Boden. Es ist nicht zu unterdrücken. Herr Yamamoto jedoch bleibt still und ausdruckslos. Ich bin nicht sicher, was er fühlt. Ich tue mein Bestes, bei ihm zu bleiben, aber das ungezügelte Lachen im Raum ist zu ansteckend. Ich falle ein.

Und plötzlich lacht auch Herr Yamamoto. Er lacht so sehr, dass Tränen seine Wangen hinabrollen. „Vielleicht haben diese verrückten Buddhisten recht“, sagt Herr Yamamoto. „Vielleicht ist die Welt nichts als ein großer Spiegel.“

„Mit dieser Bemerkung lasst uns schließen.“ sage ich. Rasch setzen sich alle in einem Kreis auf den Boden, kniend in Seiza, und verbeugen sich tief. Immer noch von Ohr zu Ohr grinsend rufen wir laut „Domo arigato gosaimashita.“ Vielen, vielen Dank. Wir sind dankbar für das Zusammen­sein, dankbar für unser Lernen, dankbar für etwas Leichtigkeit in unserem Leben, dankbar für Herrn Yamamoto.

Herr Yamamoto wirft sich seinen Schal um den Hals, wirft seine Aktentasche in den Korb, und springt auf sein Fahrrad. Die frische Nachtluft füllt seine Lungen. Der Schnee sieht weißer aus. Er wirbelt; er fällt aufwärts.

 

Japanische Wörter und Phrasen

Bento: eine Sushi-Box zum Mitnehmen

7-Eleven: eine japanische Supermarktkette, geöffnet von 7 bis 23 Uhr

Domo arigato gosaimashita: vielen Dank

Onegaishimasu: bitte hilf mir, bitte nimm dich meiner an

Seiza: traditionelle und förmliche Sitzhaltung, auf dem Boden kniend, Beine eng gefaltet unter den Oberschenkeln, Po auf den Fersen

Zen chigau: völlig anders.

 

Original: Bruce Fertman, aus „Teaching by Hand, Learning by Heart“ Seite 100, „A Little Lightness“

Übersetzung: Matthias Liesenhoff 2018-10-21