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Posts tagged ‘egocentricity’

A Grace of Sense – Where Our Inner World and Outer World Meet – Part I – A 10 Week Online Course with Bruce Fertman – October 3rd – December 6th, 2020

Already people have registered to partake in, A Grace of Sense – Where Our Inner World and Outer World Meet, from Scotland, England, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Iran, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and United States. That is why I decided to teach two classes, as to accommodate all of our different time zones. Usually, I have to trek around to world to get to people from so many different countries, but this way I can do so leaving a much lighter carbon footprint.

Yes, I cannot be with you in person. I cannot work with my hands as a way of helping you to access this material. But, at the same time, as I acclimate to this new medium I find, there is a surprising amount that I can successfully communicate visually and verbally.

Eventbrite makes it very easy for you to read about and register for this course. If you give yourself the time to read this material slowly and let it sink in, then you will know if this course if for you. If my words speak to you, if they move you, consider studying with me. If you have any questions, write to me. I am not going anywhere!

There is a handsome saving if you register by August 15th.

A Grace of Sense – Europe

 

Photo: B. Fertman

 

A Grace of Sense – Asian Pacific

 

Photo: B. Fertman

 

A Grace of Sense – Americas

 

Navajo Woman – Photo: B. Fertman

About Bruce Fertman

“In Bruce’s class you feel as if you are sitting by a deep, soft lake. He is the embodiment of his work. His pace and patience, his quiet confidence, allows people to unfold and open layer by layer. The superfluous falls away, leaving only life’s inner vitality effortlessly expressing itself through you. And then you know, ‘That’s who I am, that is who I could be.’”

Margarete Tueshaus – Alexander Teacher, Equestrian, Germany

Gone is the straight-lined striving, the stopping and oughting. Instead curiosity, inquisitiveness, and permission to experiment, to play, to open boxes and to climb out of them into a world of possibility – a world both soft and strong. And all this through a quiet power, a clarity of speech, and a wealth of wisdom. For me, Bruce’s work is more than exciting; it is important, both to the world and to anyone involved in any way with Alexander’s Technique.

Annie Turner – Alexander Technique Teacher, England

Having done so for 30 years, Bruce continues to teach annually in Europe, Asia, and the United States helping people to understand and experience the interconnectedness between physical and spiritual grace.

In 1982, Bruce co-founded the Alexander Alliance International, an intergenerational, multicultural community/school, now with programs in Germany, Switzerland, Austria, England, Japan, Korea, Australia, New Zealand, and America.

Author of  Teaching By Hand/Learning By Heart, Delving into the Work of F.M. Alexander, Bruce currently lives and works in Osaka, Japan and Coyote, New Mexico.

 

 

A Peek into My Next Book – The Dismantling of the Ego -Somatic Musings Inspired by and in Honor of the Work of Claudio Naranjo

 

“Identity would seem to be the garment with which one covers the nakedness of the self: in which case, it is best that the garment be loose, a little like the robes of the desert, through which one’s nakedness can always be felt, and, sometimes, discerned.”

 Baldwin

 

 

 

 

The Dismantling of the Ego

 Mantle derives from the Latin, mantellum, to “cloak”. So, to mantle the ego is to cover it. Once covered, we do not see it. Our own egos are somehow veiled, enshrouded, hidden from our view. To dismantle the ego is to uncover it, unveil it, to make it visible to us. This is the first step. I use the word ego colloquially. When we say someone has a big ego, or is egotistical, or egocentric we just mean that they are a bit full of themselves, preoccupied with themselves, overly centered around themselves. Once our egos are visible to us, we can take the second step of dismantling the ego. We can begin the process of deconstructing the ego, dissembling it, analyzing it, until we come to a deep understanding of what our ego is and how our particular ego operates.

As we take it apart, and begin to understand it, we find ourselves feeling better. We come to realize, sometimes suddenly, sometimes gradually, that our egos themselves have been serving as a kind of mantle, covering who we really are.

We realize that it is our ego with which we have been identifying and showing to others. It would be as if we thoroughly identified with our clothes and make up and jewelry, that we began to believe that this is who I am, this is me. We make our own “coat of many colors”, and we show this coat to the world. And then we realize that this cloak, this coat, and all these accoutrements are not us, that who we really are lives underneath this attire, in a place that we cannot see, but only sense.

This brings me back to Baldwins’ quote, which I will quote again here.

“Identity would seem to be the garment with which one covers the nakedness of the self: in which case, it is best that the garment be loose, a little like the robes of the desert, through which one’s nakedness can always be felt, and, sometimes, discerned.”

It is best that the garment be loose. But how do we actually do that? How do we loosen the grip our egos have over us? To be able to loosen the garment, the ego, we first must know we are wearing a garment. We must know that we have come to identify who we are with our garment. Without this recognition, we are living a life of mistaken identity. We are not who we think we are. Once we know we are wearing a garment, we can examine it, get to know it in great detail. Only then, can we figure out how to loosen it. Once loosened, we can breathe. Feeling comes back into our bodies.

There is nothing more we really have to do. Everything we need is there, under the garment. Nothing is missing.

All the work involved, and there is a great deal of work to be done, is in learning how to dismantle the ego, learning how to uncover it, learning how to deconstruct it, analyze it, and understand it, physically, psychologically, socially, and spiritually, with the goal of loosening it.

Once loosened the rest, mysteriously, seems to happen by itself. Grace enters into the process.

In no way have I finished my work. There seems to be layers upon layers to the ego, but I can say that some progress has been made. As a teacher, I find myself teaching what I do not know and most need to learn. I am my slowest students. Even when progress has been made, vigilance is required. Best not to rest on one laurels.

Of course, philosophers, psychologists, theologians, and healers have a great deal to say on this subject, but no one I have encountered understood the array of “garments” we wear, the various fabrics, cuts, patterns, weavings, layers, and fashion statements made, more than Claudio Naranjo, hence my dedicating this book to him.

How do we know when we are making progress, when we are living non-egocentrically?

We know when loving becomes more important than being loved, when seeing becomes more important than being seen, when hearing becomes more important than being heard, when appreciating becomes more important than being appreciated, when understanding becomes more important than being understood, when serving becomes more important than being served, when thanking becomes more important than being thanked, when forgiving becomes more important than being forgiven, when blessing becomes more important than being blessed.

But before embarking on this journey toward non-egocentric living, I would like to introduce myself, to tell you how I came to perceive people, first physically, then psychology, and finally, spiritually.

to be continued…